UVC-360

How Does UVC Destroy Germs?

Posted by christinmyates 07.10.18

UVC Dimerization

UVC Dimerization

UVC wavelengths are between 200 and 300 nanometers, making them germicidal – meaning they are capable of inactivating microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and protozoa. This quality makes UVC energy an effective, environmentally-friendly and chemical-free way to eradicate dangerous microorganisms in any environment, but especially in hospitals that contain drug-resistant superbugs including MRSA and C. diff.

The high energy from short wavelength UVC light is absorbed in the cellular RNA and DNA, damaging nucleic acids and preventing microorganisms from infecting and reproducing. This absorption of UVC energy forms new bonds between nucleotides, creating double bonds or “dimers.” Dimerization of molecules, particularly thymine, is the most common type of damage incurred by UVC light in microorganisms. Formation of thymine dimers in the DNA of bacteria and viruses prevents replication and inability to infect.

To learn more, click here.

Posted 07.10.18
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